Hello. My name's Nathan, and I love Trader Joe's. My wife Sonia does too. She's a great shopper, has excellent taste and knows good value when she comes across it. As many of you know, Trader Joe's is unsurpassed in the world of good-value grocery stores, so we spend a lot of our time and money there. Although the store fairly consistently delivers great taste with its own unique line of food products, there are definitely some big-hits, and unfortunately, there are some misses...

After doing a couple of internet searches for reviews of TJ's food items, Sonia discerned an apparent dearth of good, quality reviews for the store's offerings. So, at her suggestion, we decided to embark on a journey of systematically reviewing every Trader Joe's product, resulting in the blog you are about to read...

A couple of months into our Trader Joe's rating adventure, an old college friend, Russ, who unbeknownst to me had been following our TJ's blog, decided that I had been slacking in my blogging duties (which, of course, I was) so he decided to contribute his own original TJ's reviews to the blog, thus enhancing it, making it more complete and adding to it a flavor of his own. He and his wife Sandy are also avid TJ's fans and, as you will soon discover, he is an excellent writer and is nearly as clever, witty and humble as I am.

Seriously though, Russ: You go, boy!

So here it is: "What's Good at Trader Joe's?"

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Friday, October 19, 2012

Trader Joe's Mexicaine Quiche

I'm not sure why TJ's decided to spell "Mexican" with a built-in homage to the cocaine cartels in Juarez. Neither Sonia (who is Mexican-American) nor I are familiar with this bizarre spelling. I guess it makes the product fancier. I'm also fond of mispronouncing "quiche" on purpose, like "kwitch-y." So, at our house, this product became "TJ's Mexi-Cocaine Kwitchy" because I'm weird like that. At any rate, we decided to sample this product and review it for you.

We followed the instructions for a conventional oven. Everything came out cooked to perfection except for the egginess in the middle. It was still too wet. The outer-crust was beginning to blacken and char, and yet the middle was a little too raw—but not to the point that we couldn't eat it.

The product has a fair amount of egg-omelette flavor and there's a hint of mild Mexican peppers. The crust was great. It reminded me of a homemade pie crust. But overall, this quiche is on the bland side. Have salt, pepper, and the hot sauce of your choice on stand-by when and if you decide to cook up this dish.

It's in the ballpark of $3. I don't remember the exact price, I can't find our receipt, and anyway, prices may vary from region to region. It strikes me as being pretty small for a $3 quiche. A grown man could easily eat the whole thing and still be a bit hungry...and holy crap! Just as I'm writing this I glanced at the nutrition information. I don't think a full day's worth of saturated fat is something that most of us are looking for in a small treat from Trader Joe's.

Originally, as I ate it, it was just yummy enough to garner 3.5 stars from me. After thinking about its economic value and its fat content, I think I'll downgrade that to an even 3 stars. Sonia gives it 3 as well, adding "That is a little bland for a Mexican dish. It should have more pepper flavor and more kick."

But don't get me wrong, if you're looking for a breakfasty comfort food omelette-thing, I'd still say it's better than most greasy-spoon diner egg-based dishes. This one's definitely not a must-buy...more like a "might-try."

Bottom line: 6 out of 10.


  1. I've eyed this several times but have always passed it by. And now I know for sure I'll skip it, "Mexican" any way you spell it should have a taste bud kick!

  2. I think "Mexicaine" is how the French spell "Mexican", to go with the french quiche. Although, at first I thought it was some goofy, southern, phonetic spelling, like how Paula Deen would say "Mexican". That saturated fat content is a real drag though.

  3. My guess on "Mexicaine" is that it is a take off on "Quiche Lorraine."

  4. Could what's left of the Truth in Advertising regulations have anything to do with this. I've noticed that products like spaghetti sauce are labeled "Italian Style" unless made in Italy.
    Then there's stuff like DiGiorno's Pizza and Wyngz, cause if it were labeled Wings, there would
    have to actually BE wings in there somewhere. Not sure, I may be totally wrong, but I do know I don't even want to guess what's in Wyngz!

  5. I love your blog and look forward to your reviews. I especially like the way you post the nutrition labels, saves me a lot of time. I appreciate your efforts, keep up the good work. Dr Oz says to maintain weight and health to never eat anything that contains over 5G of fat per serving, I sometimes cheat and have 6G - 34G never!
    Thanks again for your time.

  6. Agreed, Emily! Good call, Jonna and Mrs Marcos, I guess "quiche" is French, and that spelling of "Mexicaine" is intended to be a match for it. Haha Donna, I guess I'll pass on the Wyngz if I see them! Ellen - thanks so much for your comment! So happy we're helping some people make better-informed grocery decisions and having fun in the process :)

  7. Mexicaine would be the French spelling (for a noun that's feminine, otherwise without the e at the end), though you would actually reverse it and say quiche mexicaine in French...

  8. I paid 2.29 for it in Philadelphia. I prefer the broccoli and cheese but do pick this one up every now and then and have it with a big salad.

  9. Personally, I find these amazing! It's the best quiche compared to the "Cheddar and Broccoli" and "Mushroom Spinach and Cheese." I could eat these everyday to be honest. Everyone has their own tastes, and I think this is one of the best frozen foods Trader Joe's has to offer :)

  10. Um, it's quiche. Eggs, cheese, cream. Not a diet food.

  11. Best store bought frozen quiche i've ever eaten.